::: Research Grant Program Application Information On-line Application Form Current Grant Recipients Past Grant Recipients Research Resources CCS Visiting Scholars' Working Papers

:::
 

Sort by:     

Year Nationality Name Position Then Topic of Research Plan
2016
Italy Federica CASALIN
Sapienza University of Rome
Associate Professor
Information Channels in Late Qing China: Exploring the Dissemination of Information about Italy in the Chinese Sources Published from 1859 to 1911
2016
Korea Jooyeon HAHM
Department of History, University of Pennsylvania, US
Ph. D. Candidate
Modern Family: Marriage and Concubinage in Colonial Taiwan, 1895-1945
2016
Spain José Ramón Pérez PORTILLO
Instituto Politécnico Nacional
Professor
Dramatic Oscillations between Protectionism and Free Trade in China and Argentina in their Corresponding Regional and International Contexts, in the 19 Century, Toward the 20th (Strategies to "Balkanize" the Middle Empire (中國) and Hispanic America's Universality Undertaken by the British Crown)
2016
USA John BANDY
Johns Hopkins University
Ph. D. Candidate
Qing-Dynasty Maritime Frontier and Social Change
2016
USA Xinmin LIU
Washington State University
Associate Professor
Re-enchanting the Picturesque in Taiwan : An Ecocritical Appraisal
2016
USA Stephen RODDY
University of San Francisco
Professor
Maritime Borderlands: Mapping Taiwan in Fin-de-siecle Fiction, Essays, and Poetry
2015
USA Peter Ditmanson
Associate Professor
Fate and Moral Politics in Ming China
2015
Philippines Clark L. Alejandrino
Georgetown University, Washington DC, USA
Ph. D. Candidate
Storm Clouds over China: Typhoons and Society in Late Imperial and Modern China
2015
Canada James Bonk
The College of Wooster
Assistant Professor
Commemoration Decentered: The Building of Prefectural Shrines for the War Dead in the Early Nineteenth Century Qing Empire
2015
USA Timothy Clifford
University of Pennsylvania
Ph. D. Candidate
Adapting Ancient Prose for Modern Writers: Reading, Editing, and Printing Classical Prose Anthologies in the Late Ming and Early Qing