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Improving India Taiwan Relations; Optimism or circumspection, Without Affecting Relations With PRC

Sadia Rahman Researcher

2017 Taiwan Fellowship Scholar

Field of Study:Politics and diplomacy

No:10058

Date:2017/6/5

Abstract:

What is big or what qualifies as small? A study on India and Taiwan is an interesting avenue to challenge our assumptions on parameters of size, if India and Taiwan are examined beyond ostensible characteristics of geography or overall economic size it becomes clear that Taiwan has larger per capita GDP and clear distinction in science and technology. This paper will focus on establishing an optimistic narrative on India-Taiwan relations. Republic of China has aroused interest abroad and on numerous occasions’ serious concerns, initially all the attention was on Taiwan’s extraordinary economic development. Taiwan became famous and much talked about as a country because it took everybody to surprise how such a small densely populated and initially poor country with no natural resources can accomplish so much and indeed media portrayed Taiwan as an economic miracle. Political system was not flattering because of KMT’s authoritarian rule, but political miracle also happened and the country transferred from authoritarian rule to a democratic system especially as compared to its arch-rival PRC; Taiwan Strait remains as one of the world’s flashpoints. Taiwan as a country fulfils every single Political Science criterion that defines an independent sovereign state; Taiwanese people deserve great admiration for their superb achievements. Though China terms it a renegade province, Taiwan is beyond that, it is a unique international entity one without precedent in world history. A win-win situation is not possible; the challenge is to transcend conventional approaches to interaction with Taiwan in the context of its ‘unique status’. A formalized, indefinite continuation of the present status quo across the Taiwan Strait, without prejudice to the claims or desires of either side, but endorsed by all concerned parties might be an acceptable interim solution. (Karackattu, 2013)